Kukla's Korner

Kukla's Korner Hockey

Perhaps This Is What The League Does Best

from David Shoalts of the Globe and Mail,

It's been two weeks since any negotiations for a collective agreement were held, and the NHL is stubbornly refusing to meet the NHL Players' Association because it claims the union will not negotiate off the owners' last offer, a frustrating bit of semantics. Semantics or not, there is no sign of any reason for the NHL to hold off on cancelling the outdoor game.

A lot of good will also vanishes with the cancellations, although this is not unusual for a league that loves to cut off its nose to spite its face. In the last five years, the Winter Classic has done more to attract casual fans to the sport through the game itself and the HBO television reality series 24/7 that chronicles both teams than any other event. Cancelling the game will tell those fans how much the NHL thinks of them.

But the striking aspect of this is that killing the event will hurt the NHL owners themselves more than it does the players. Most of the money from the 115,000 fans that were expected to pack the Michigan stadium and set a world record for attendance at a hockey game goes directly to the league, along with all the other revenue generated by the event.

more

Filed in: NHL Talk, | KK Hockey | Permalink
 

Comments

Avatar

I have a question: Has Shoalts always been this poor of a writer?  For example:

-“Most of the money from the 115,000 fans that were expected to pack the Michigan stadium and set a world record for attendance at a hockey game goes directly to the league, along with all the other revenue generated by the event.”

No, no I don’t think that is true.  WC revenue gets treated like any other HRR, right?  Under the previous CBA, ‘most’ of that money would have gone to the players, not the owners.

-“Oblivion may strike some as too strong a word, but that is precisely where this league appears determined to take its brand of hockey as far as the United States is concerned.”

Hyperbole, and ill informed hyperbole ignorant of history to boot.  The NHL struggles to draw more than a 1.0 ratings-wise in all but their highest-profile games or events.

-“The players are hurt in the sense that they are supposed to get 50 per cent or whatever share of NHL revenue they will if a new collective agreement is ever negotiated by these people. But the cancellation has a minimal direct impact on each of the NHL’s 720 or so players. They will still get paid if they ever drop the puck again.”

That’s just ignorant.  Owners get more playing only 5 years at 50-50 than they would playing 6 at 43-57.  Players get less playing 5 years at 57-43 then they would get playing 6 years at 50-50.

Since in any situation the players will not get a better split of revenue than they have now, every dollar they lose is a dollar gone forever.  Since in almost all situation it can be anticipated that the owners will get a more advantageous share of revenue, every dollar they lose in revenues now will be made up over time.

The time factor here is so wildly against the players that for Shoalts to try and claim minimal impact on them with regards to the lockout is just shockingly stupid.

Posted by HockeyinHD on 10/30/12 at 11:05 AM ET

J.J. from Kansas's avatar

Hyperbole, and ill informed hyperbole ignorant of history to boot.  The NHL struggles to draw more than a 1.0 ratings-wise in all but their highest-profile games or events.

Oblivion is just about the only thing worse than that.

Posted by J.J. from Kansas on 10/30/12 at 11:27 AM ET

LivinLaVidaLockout's avatar

-“Most of the money from the 115,000 fans that were expected to pack the Michigan stadium and set a world record for attendance at a hockey game goes directly to the league, along with all the other revenue generated by the event.”

No, no I don’t think that is true.  WC revenue gets treated like any other HRR, right?  Under the previous CBA, ‘most’ of that money would have gone to the players, not the owners.

I don’t think you’re really in disagreement as much as you think you are.

For the Winter Classic, the NHL buys out a homegame from the host (so they buy 21,000 tickets or however many from the Red Wings) and then bring in all the profits from the game.  Instead of the money from the Winter Classic going into Mr. Ilitch’s coffers, the money goes to the NHL which is then distributed to the other owners, or however they split it.

So, yes, you can say the revenue from the WC gets “treated like any other HRR,” but the difference is either Mike Ilitch himself or 30 owners split that revenue with the players.

Posted by LivinLaVidaLockout on 10/30/12 at 11:32 AM ET

Add a Comment

Please limit embedded image or media size to 575 pixels wide.

Add your own avatar by joining Kukla's Korner, or logging in and uploading one in your member control panel.

Captchas bug you? Join KK or log in and you won't have to bother.

Smileys

Notify me of follow-up comments?

Feed

Most Recent Blog Posts

About Kukla's Korner Hockey

Paul Kukla founded Kukla’s Korner in 2005 and the site has since become the must-read site on the ‘net for all the latest happenings around the NHL.

From breaking news to in-depth stories around the league, KK Hockey is updated with fresh stories all day long and will bring you the latest news as quickly as possible.

Email Paul anytime at pk@kuklaskorner.com

 

image

image

image