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Morning Line- Damien Cox

If the NHL can actually pull off this bubble deal, it would be one of the great successes in league history. Problem is, league already encasing entire experiment in secrecy. Public has a right to know facts, not just NHL public relations propaganda.

NHL should and must reveal names of those who test positive, and make public any and all violations by team members. This isn’t their secret to keep.

-Damien Cox via Twitter

added 10:16am,

 

Filed in: NHL Talk, | KK Hockey | Permalink
 

Comments

TreKronor's avatar

NHL should and must reveal names of those who test positive, and make public any and all violations by team members. This isn’t their secret to keep.

You for real Damien?

Posted by TreKronor on 07/06/20 at 09:17 AM ET

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HIPPA Law.  Thats why Coxy Boy.  I cant believe Cox gets paid to do this.

Posted by ThatGuy on 07/06/20 at 10:15 AM ET

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Dave Hodge, noted pen-flipper, once again the voice of reason.

Posted by mc keeper on 07/06/20 at 11:41 AM ET

SYF's avatar

I don’t know how it is in Canada, but in the United States, we have HIPAA laws, which puts stringent and nearly immutable protection on patient privacy.  Where the hell is Cox’s head in this???  His “journalism” is specious and dangerously lacking in correct information.  If a player’s physical test is revealed without his consent, that player has legal recourse through the Office of Civil Rights.  And man, the OCR is a relentless bulldog about patient privacy.  Cox has got to be stopped before too many people start eating up his shit like hogs to sour corn.

Posted by SYF from impossible and oddly communally possessive sluts on 07/06/20 at 02:06 PM ET

Hootinani's avatar

Not a big fan of any of this, but to say that the public has a right to information on the negotiated deal or about players health info is silly.

Posted by Hootinani from the parade following Babs out of town on 07/06/20 at 03:48 PM ET

d ca's avatar

NO. Athletes are not covered by HIPPA.. These team doctors and team trainers are not subject to HIPAA, only to their employer agreements. (I do not know Canadian health care laws—but this is fact in the US)

Athletes through their signed contracts consent to share their health information with their employer (even if the athlete visits an independent medical professional—once that information is provided to the employer): the team can publish it to the public. Teams are not legally bound entities under HIPPA: they are employers. HPPA only applies to health plans (insurance companies), health care clearinghouses, and most health care providers.

The exception is when a player goes to an independent medical professional doesn’t sign a HIPPA consent form and fails to notify his employer. If the employer were to call the physician and the physician disclosed it to anyone both the physician and the party he disclosed it to would be in violation of HIPPA.

This is what happened to Jason Pierre Paul when he blew his fingers off with fireworks. His patient chart from the hospital was released and posted on twitter by Schefter (here). Long story short the hospital terminated two employees that accessed the chart (it’s recorded) via unauthorized access to patient medical records and were terminated. Schefter and ESPN were sued and agreed to a settlement. I don’t know if they went after the hospital employees criminally or he sued the hospital as that wasn’t public like the ESPN suit.

The player would be in breach of his contract though if he went for help and didn’t disclose it to the team.

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) is a federal law that required the creation of national standards to protect sensitive patient health information from being disclosed without the patient’s consent or knowledge. It’s why any provider will require a HIPAA consent form in order to be seen.

Again it only applies to: health plans (insurance companies), health care clearinghouses, and most health care providers.

The max penalty (criminal charges not civil) for a HIPAA violation by an individual is $250,000. Knowingly violating HIPAA Rules with malicious intent or for personal gain can result in a prison term of up to 10 years in jail.

All this said. The NHL could have an agreement with the NHLPA not to disclose test results without the players consent—that is what could be holding up any disclosures.

Posted by d ca on 07/06/20 at 03:52 PM ET

WingedRider's avatar

Cox has got to be stopped before too many people start eating up his shit like hogs to sour corn.

Posted by SYF from impossible and oddly communally possessive sluts on 07/06/20 at 02:06 PM ET

Not sure if he (Damien Cox) is the worst of the worst. Not sure what he did before, Lawn Bowling??

He has to get turfed SOON!

Posted by WingedRider from Saskatoon, SK on 07/08/20 at 11:33 AM ET

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Paul Kukla founded Kukla’s Korner in 2005 and the site has since become the must-read site on the ‘net for all the latest happenings around the NHL.

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