Kukla's Korner

Tasca's Take

A Reminder

Another lesson for hockey fans who like to leave the rink before the final buzzer.  Courtesy of Neate Sager:

It's a coach job to always foresee disaster lurking. When Sudbury Wolves coach Trent Cull vociferously argued a too-many-call against his team with 5:31 left, people might have wondered why he was so upset since his team was leading the Niagara IceDogs 5-1.

It turned out to be prophetic. Hamilton (1G-2A, +1) and Strome (4A) set up a goal off the ensuing faceoff, igniting the damnedest comeback in a month of Mondays. Niagara scored four goals in the final 5:30 of regulation, including twice in the final 30 seconds, before Strome and Hamilton each converted in the shootout for the 6-5 win.

It's amazing how one goal can change the momentum of a hockey game.  What's even more remarkable is Niagara had to kill off a two-minute penalty during that final five-minute span. 

I can't help but wonder how many of the 3,145 fans at the Jack Gatecliff Arena stuck around to witness their hometown team pull off such a stunning comeback.  You can bet some of them were already on the highway by the time the IceDogs began their charge.  Meanwhile, the loyal fans who stayed at the rink to ride out what looked like a sure loss were instead treated to a memorable finish.

Last night's game in St. Catharines is a beautiful reminder of how great the sport of hockey really is - even without the NHL. 

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About Tasca's Take

Tasca's Take is written by Joe Tasca. Born and raised in Westerly, Rhode Island, Joe works as a broadcaster for seven radio stations in southern New England. Whether that's a testament to his on-air ability or because he has a desparate need for money is debatable.

Joe spends his summers playing golf, enjoying the beauty of Misquamicut Beach, and wining and dining girls who are easily awed by the mere presence of a radio personality. During the winter months, he can usually be found taking in a hockey game somewhere in North America. In the spring, he spends much of his time in botanical gardens tiptoeing through the tulips, while autumn is a time to frolic with his golden retrievers through piles of his neighbors’ leaves.