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Your father fires your coach - Do you walk out with your teammates in protest? An open forum.

As reported by The Malik Report and Puck Daddy there is a player revolt in Flint. The owner, apparently upset over his son's playing time, fired the entire the coaching staff immediately following an emotional come-from-behind victory. Included among the entire 24 player team roster who threw their jerseys on the floor of the front office symbolizing their united quitting of the the team was the owner's son.

Personally, I find the situation appalling, but apparently nepotism is fairly common in teenage sports and younger, as noted by KK members in the comments of the initial TMR report cited above. But what I find admirable is the owner's son is calling out his father's wish for special treatment by standing with his teammates. How many kids would have the courage to do that?

If you were in that same position, would you stand with your teammates and quit the team, or would you try to stay out of it and hope it all blew over quickly?

If you were on the team and your coach was just fired because of something like this, would you lead a revolt? Would you go along with the person or people who call for one?

What would you do? How would you handle a situation like this?

I'd like to think I would walk out with the team, regardless of potential consequences, that I'd have the courage to stand up for my coach(s). The person I am today would walk out with my team, that I can say for certain.

I yield the floor.

Filed in: Non-NHL Hockey, | KK Members Blog | Permalink
 

Comments

Red Winger's avatar

And now the coaching staff have been re-hired.

Daddy must have been embarrassed by his little hissy-fit.

Posted by Red Winger from Sault Ste Marie, MI on 11/09/15 at 07:13 PM ET

Paul's avatar

Firebirds did release a statement on the re-hire this afternoon via Twitter.

Posted by Paul from Motown Area on 11/09/15 at 07:17 PM ET

Bradley97's avatar

Glad this resolved quickly: Buzzing The Net

However the question still remains…

What would you do?

Posted by Bradley97 on 11/09/15 at 08:59 PM ET

shanetx's avatar

Apologies for this being a disjointed response.  It was written up on my phone during breaks in work and it’s made my train of thought somewhat wobbly.

I find the impetus behind the question (“what would you have done?”) much more interesting than the answers.  I don’t understand why it’s being asked because no one here can give any semblance of a satisfactory answer.  We simply do not know enough about any of the dynamics involved to speculate as to why everything went down as it did with regards to the kids role in the situation, nor should we, really.  Everything I’ve seen phrases the kids involvement in the walkout as a positive.  He’s showing great character, doing the right thing, etc.  I think that’s one helluva leap.  It’s entirely possible that’s the case but I’ve seen nothing that really supports that any more than any other possibility.  It’s just as possible that the kid has some measure of blame- who knows what the dad has been hearing from the son, or how the locker room’s sentiment was conveyed.  The son is the owner’s ears on the inside, right?  And there are a ton of options in between.  It’s possible the son agrees with his father but felt pressured by his peers, teammates and friends and showed solidarity as a result of pressure, just as it is possible that he hates the coach’s guts but believed in doing what he saw as right.  That avoids the entire other ends of this which is the dynamics between father and son, as well as son and coach.

Ultimately, my experience in situations like this is that the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.  When a parent is amoral, self involved and pompous, their children are frequently similarly morally deficient and entitled.  I don’t feel like a parent who would behave in such a manner is likely to have raised a kid who is acting like everyone wants to assume this kid is.  There’s so much more to the story than we know.  We know two things about the kid;  he’s not as good at hockey as his dad wants him to be, and he sided with his teammates.  That’s not a lot to lionize someone based on.

So with all that said; I’m more interested in why anyone is concerned with how others would react.  It seems like the only answers we could possibly give are much more rooted in our own family relations and our flawed interpretations of the situation than they ever could be even tangentially related to this actual issue.

Posted by shanetx from Floydada, Texas on 11/09/15 at 10:08 PM ET

calquake's avatar

I would tell everyone I was adopted. cheese

Posted by calquake from a.k.a. Uniquake, workin' on my manifesto on 11/09/15 at 11:34 PM ET

KelseyAnn's avatar

Growing up playing travel ice hockey (AA or AAA depending on year/team) I can attest firsthand that nepotism and politics in youth sports is alive and well. With teams that don’t have “owners” per se because they belong to an association, you’ll more frequently see a parent involved in the association or as a coach, but the same sort of dynamic as owner father/player son is still there.

As far as the father/son thing goes and how that affects the operations of the team, I have seen both sides. I have been on teams where the father was the coach and played their kid a lot more than they deserved just because of who they were. They would get put out on the ice in critical situations such as down by a goal with a minute left while a much more skilled player that gave us a better chance at winning sat on the bench. I have also played with kids that were really, really good, and their dad was the coach and they were total dicks to their kids. They played them a lot (although given their high skill level no one felt that was unfair) but were so damn hard on them that the kid was always on the edge of a breakdown. They were apt to disobey their parent in retaliation of being ridden so hard.

So when it comes to this kid, it’s definitely interesting to speculate on how he factored in to what happened. Without knowing him I can’t say for sure…he could have had absolutely no say in the matter, and his dad’s decision was entirely his own hence the kid siding with his team, or he felt guilty and/or pressured into siding with them in their protest.

In any case, I’m glad this is getting resolved fast. This is a brand new team that I have enjoyed watching so far this season (what I have been able to catch), it just sounds like they have to get some more ducks in a row and the owner needs to slow his roll a bit.

Posted by KelseyAnn from Ahwatukee, Arizona on 11/09/15 at 11:48 PM ET

Bradley97's avatar

So with all that said; I’m more interested in why anyone is concerned with how others would react.  It seems like the only answers we could possibly give are much more rooted in our own family relations and our flawed interpretations of the situation than they ever could be even tangentially related to this actual issue.

Posted by shanetx from Floydada, Texas on 11/09/15 at 09:08 PM ET

The first question is just one option. I know it’s next to impossible to put oneself in the shoes of the son, and that’s why I asked a second set of questions:

If you were on the team and your coach was just fired because of something like this, would you lead a revolt? Would you go along with the person or people who call for one?

I’m sorry if I implied both questions were asking you to put yourself in the son’s shoes.

The second set of questions is meant to put yourself in the shoes of the rest of the team, Somebody in that locker room came up with the idea to quit the team and the team went along with it. That is fascinating to me because it took guts and it worked with the coaches being unfired the next day and the players unquitting.

But what if it didn’t work? What if the players were not supported by the league and were left to fend for themselves in this battle?

So yes, I am interested in the son, and wonder what I would do if I were the son. But I’m also interested in the team, and I’d like to think I know what I would do if I were on that team.

Maybe I should have phrased the question as follows:

If you were a player on the team and your coach was just fired because of something like this, would you lead a revolt? Would you go along with the person or people who call for one?

The title of this topic is meant to be provocative to get your attention. The topic is larger than the initial question, and hopefully this clarification answers your question.

Posted by Bradley97 on 11/10/15 at 12:54 AM ET

TreKronor's avatar

I find it a good story, but childish. Do the players know exactly wht the coach was fired? Was there more at play?

So all the players walk out. .. Then what?

Its the kind of thing kids do; not adults.

Posted by TreKronor on 11/10/15 at 02:14 PM ET

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