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Savard May Come Cheap

from Kevin McGran of the Toronto Star,

His seven prospects locked up in his suitcase as he returned to Toronto, Leafs GM Brian Burke set his mind on what will be a busy few days leading up to Thursday’s free agent frenzy.

First up is Marc Savard. The Bruins are said to be ready to ship their playmaking centre. The Leafs are in the mix, and the price tag is much cheaper than Thomas Kaberle.

This opportunity is an unintended consequence of the Phil Kessel trade.

continued

Filed in: NHL Teams, Boston Bruins, Toronto Maple Leafs, | KK Hockey | Permalink
  Tags: marc+savard

Comments

Avatar

I don’t understand why Boston would want to get rid of Savard.  The guy produces every year.  Sure he has injuries, but he is still the best overall player the Bruins have.

Posted by gretzky_to_lemieux on 06/27/10 at 11:53 PM ET

Chris in A^2's avatar

Savard isn’t going cheap, especially not with Boston owning Toronto’s first round pick.

Posted by Chris in A^2 from Nyquist Puck Control on 06/28/10 at 02:51 AM ET

Moq's avatar

Boston have depth on center, a $54M pay roll with quite a few interesting players left to sign, and unable to move someone like Thomas instead of Savard. They probably judged that the team performed decently when Savard was out. That makes him expendable despite his production.

Given that they probably wants to sign and use Seguin, re-sign Wheeler, Stuart, and depth players like Paille and Campbell, the desire to take a lot salary in return for Savard seems minimal.

Posted by Moq from Denmark on 06/28/10 at 10:15 AM ET

Nathan's avatar

Boston is probably thinking a few years ahead. They have a few young centermen that will have to get paid, so someone’s salary has to go away. Savard, with his NTC, is the hardest to move, but since he’s (allegedly) agreed to go to a few teams, it gives them a window of opportunity to lose the contract.

Thank Gary for this CBA. If something doesn’t get fixed in the agreement ASAP, these types of moves will become more and more common, and soon enough we’ll have NBA-style trades making up the bulk of transactions—teams trading expiring contracts to teams that need to cut budget and/or make cap space in exchange for prospects. There will be very few “hockey” trades any more, where the deal was truly based in value for both sides. No more Hossa/Heatley deals to be made.

Posted by Nathan from the scoresheet! on 06/28/10 at 10:18 AM ET

SK77's avatar

No more Hossa/Heatley deals to be made.

Last I checked these were made under the current CBA.

Posted by SK77 on 06/28/10 at 10:31 AM ET

Avatar

Last I checked these were made under the current CBA.

Exactly.

Thank Gary for this CBA.

I do thank him.  Seriously, without this CBA, you would have the same exact crap going on in baseball.  I love the idea that teams that sign players are held to their contracts.

Posted by gretzky_to_lemieux on 06/28/10 at 11:46 AM ET

WingMan's avatar

Not sure if I am TO I would want this guy…  yes he is good.  But he is getting older and has a big ticket for a few more years…  I like the youth movement in TO and I hope they stick with it.  It has been a lifetime since it has been done…

Posted by WingMan from The Q C on 06/28/10 at 12:13 PM ET

J.J. from Kansas's avatar

I do thank him.  Seriously, without this CBA, you would have the same exact crap going on in baseball.  I love the idea that teams that sign players are held to their contracts.

Posted by gretzky_to_lemieux on 06/28/10 at 09:46 AM ET

I’m not sure what you mean by the “same exact crap going on in baseball” followed by “I love the idea that teams that sign players are held to their contracts”.

MLB contracts are basically guaranteed.  They come with a release fee that pays a player a good portion of their remaining contract dollars if the player if released.  Teams rarely use that out.

I’m assuming you’re talking about the problem in baseball where, in a non-capped league, big clubs spend enough to cover the smaller clubs’ payrolls for nearly a decade and you always see the same few ultra-rich teams going deep into the playoffs?

Well, the Stanley Cup Playoffs may be showing that it’s not just a few teams, but it’s the haves that are making it.  Since the lockout, only 2 of 20 teams to make the conference finals have been under the salary midpoint (and eligible for rule 1 revenue sharing) and neither of those teams won the cup (only Pittsburgh in 2007-08 made it to the finals).  It’s arguable as to whether to even count Pittsburgh among this list as they knew they couldn’t spend too much on salary that season knowing full well that both Crosby and Malkin were coming due for their enormous raises off their entry-level deals.  Since the lockout, most of the most successful clubs have consistently been not only over the midcap, but very close to the cap.

When you have teams in the league that can’t afford to spend up to the cap, you have the exact same problem.

Posted by J.J. from Kansas on 06/28/10 at 12:56 PM ET

Nathan's avatar

Last I checked these were made under the current CBA.

Posted by some kid on 06/28/10 at 08:31 AM ET

You are correct, my point is that this is a process, and that as time moves forward with this hard cap and no mechanism for GMs to restructure contracts or pick up dollars in trades, it slowly eliminates the feasibility of “hockey” trades, and increases the number of “financial” trades.

I do thank him.  Seriously, without this CBA, you would have the same exact crap going on in baseball.  I love the idea that teams that sign players are held to their contracts.

Posted by gretzky_to_lemieux on 06/28/10 at 09:46 AM ET

Not sure what you mean. Baseball has guaranteed contracts. So does the NHL. The NFL does not (except through up-front signing bonuses), perhaps that’s the league you’re thinking of?

There are many legitimate arguments for the cap, but the reasons we have one now were obviously the wrong ones—we still have problems in Phoenix, Nashville, Atlanta, Florida, Columbus, and Long Island that the CBA was supposed to solve. Which was always a lie.

I’ve given up about the cap. I can’t win that battle. The NHL is now and will forever be a cap league.

But I take issue with the revenue sharing, the way the Canadian clubs, Detroit, Philly, NYR, etc. are subsidizing a team like Phoenix. It’s absurd to watch the Coyotes be major players at the trade deadline this past season, increasing their spending on players, with money that’s essentially coming from the healthy hockey markets.

This works so well in the NFL because the NFL is big everywhere. Even crappy markets like Jacksonville make money thanks to the national TV deal and the fact that no matter how shitty their local team is, the average sports fan is NFL-crazy to the point that they’ll show up to see the OTHER team.

We know this very well in Detroit… hahaha. Our team has never been relevant yet they still make money hand over fist.

If the NHL gets to that point, I’m okay with revenue sharing, but the NHL will never get to this point because it is too regional.

Posted by Nathan from the scoresheet! on 06/28/10 at 12:59 PM ET

J.J. from Kansas's avatar

But I take issue with the revenue sharing, the way the Canadian clubs, Detroit, Philly, NYR, etc. are subsidizing a team like Phoenix. It’s absurd to watch the Coyotes be major players at the trade deadline this past season, increasing their spending on players, with money that’s essentially coming from the healthy hockey markets.

Heh, Nathan and I had basically the same point.

A small bit of added info to this paragraph though (as I do agree with it).  Most of the subsidization of the coyotes actually comes from players’ escrow which made the NHLPA give back almost 13% of salaries last year and is expected to return about 11% of players’ salaries this year (which is about 176 million dollars).  Pretty much none of the bottom 5 teams are even worth that much.

The big clubs are rolling in dough and the players are paying to keep the struggling teams afloat.

Posted by J.J. from Kansas on 06/28/10 at 01:09 PM ET

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Paul Kukla founded Kukla’s Korner in 2005 and the site has since become the must-read site on the ‘net for all the latest happenings around the NHL.

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