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OT- George Steinbrenne Dies At Age 80

from Richard Goldstein of the New York Times,

George Steinbrenner, who bought a declining Yankees team in 1973, promised to stay out of its daily affairs and then, in an often tumultuous reign, placed his formidable stamp on 7 World Series championship teams, 11 pennant winners and a sporting world powerhouse valued at perhaps $1.6 billion, died Tuesday morning. He was 80 and lived in Tampa, Fla.

“He was an incredible and charitable man,” the family said in a statement.

“He was a visionary and a giant in the world of sports. He took a great but struggling franchise and turned it into a champion again.”

continued

Filed in: | KK Hockey | Permalink
  Tags: george+steinbrenne, new+york+yankees

Comments

Evilpens's avatar

Destroyed Baseball !!!  Made it the League of HAVES & Havenots

Posted by Evilpens on 07/13/10 at 11:44 AM ET

Nathan's avatar

Destroyed Baseball !!!  Made it the League of HAVES & Havenots

Posted by Evilpens on 07/13/10 at 10:44 AM ET

Yikes. Not sure you’re really up on your baseball history if this is what you think. Granted, he certainly has been a big reason for the disparity between the Yankees and the rest of the league (speaking of payroll, that is). But people need to be really careful when talking about what’s to blame for disparity in MLB, and whether or not they really want to change it. Frankly, the “reserve” clause and a lot of the collusion problems in the ‘80s (that subsequently led to the lost season) damaged what level of parity baseball had more than anything.

Baseball player contracts are certainly out of control, but not surprisingly, after an eternity of owners making HUGE dollars, keeping all the talent under their thumbs, all the while continually colluding against the players for more and more greed… things whiplashed back in their face in the last 15 years.

Posted by Nathan from the scoresheet! on 07/13/10 at 12:03 PM ET

Nathan's avatar

Oh, and by the way, that was kind of an off-color comment for a guy that just passed away. I hate the Yankees (as a sports team) as much as anyone, but for all I know Steinbrenner was a great family man and good person. And certainly he was a brilliant businessman that earned plenty.

People are so quick to say he and the Yankees ruined baseball, but what would baseball have been like had the Yankees continued their slide and never rebuilt? The Yankees are the reason we have so much interest in baseball across the globe, and that’s a presence baseball absolutely needed to survive the strike and then the steroid problems.

Posted by Nathan from the scoresheet! on 07/13/10 at 12:08 PM ET

Evilpens's avatar

Nathan, The Big Market teams Don’t want to change it !! The use the Succos & other small Market teams as their 21nd Farm System

& they Pay off the Small Market owners with the Tax on over a certain amount of Money ^ The Succos Owner Nutting makes Money every season so they are Happy, The Small Market Fans Bend over & grab their Ankles

Posted by Evilpens on 07/13/10 at 12:10 PM ET

Evilpens's avatar

Nathan Baseball is Dying slowly everyday with the Markets who AT best Have a 2 -3 year window before their Good Players become eligible for FA

Yeah if you are in NY, Boston Philly, Chicago or LA yeah it’s great !! go check out the message board for Small Markets Teams

Posted by Evilpens on 07/13/10 at 12:17 PM ET

Evilpens's avatar

The Cap is why teams Like the Pens have a Chance in Hockey, Well Not really because the Pens Money Man is Ron Burkle who is worth at Last Check 3.5 BILLION !! so he has the Money & has Caught the Itch for Hockey & winning

Posted by Evilpens on 07/13/10 at 12:19 PM ET

J.J. from Kansas's avatar

The Cap is why teams Like the Pens have a Chance in Hockey, Well Not really because the Pens Money Man is Ron Burkle who is worth at Last Check 3.5 BILLION !! so he has the Money & has Caught the Itch for Hockey & winning

Posted by Evilpens on 07/13/10 at 11:19 AM ET

I’m really starting to sound like a broken record here, but there are still a lot of misconceptions.

The Cap is also why teams like the Predators and the Thrashers have no chance.

Is it really parity if it only applies to 15 teams in a 30 team league?

MLB and the NHL are closer than you think.  The only difference is that the small-market teams’ owners actually make money.  I know the choice for the fans isn’t a good one either (watch us suck or don’t, either way we don’t care), but the choice for teams if you want to force them to not suck or not make money is even tougher.  A salary cap in baseball might help, but if it’s implemented like in the NHL, all that’s going to do is make the small-market teams struggle to make money.

Posted by J.J. from Kansas on 07/13/10 at 12:27 PM ET

UMFan's avatar

Destroyed Baseball !!!  Made it the League of HAVES & Havenots

No, he just took advanage of the system. I hate the Yankees. I hate what they stand for and I dislike their obnoxious fans. One thing that you can say about Steinbrenner though; He built an impressive monster. Thats hard to do in New York. Just ask the owners of the Knicks and the Rangers. And by all acounts he was a good father, which in the end, is good enough to earn a little good will. RIP…oh, and lets hope the Yankees start to suck for a while.

Posted by UMFan from Denver, Colorado on 07/13/10 at 12:28 PM ET

cs6687's avatar

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pvg9jo5ZxnE

Posted by cs6687 on 07/13/10 at 12:56 PM ET

Avatar

First things first, RIP George.

The whole thing about big payroll vs small payroll is moot.  I’m sorry, there are more ‘small market’ teams in baseball than ‘large market’ teams.  If the small markets banded together to force something to happen, they could.  However, the system helps them out as well.  It sucks being a fan of the Pirates, but that’s just the way it is.  And just because you bring all the all stars together doesn’t mean you will win all the time, it just gives you a better chance.

The Cap is also why teams like the Predators and the Thrashers have no chance.

Well, like the small market teams in baseball, they just need to make better decisions (more for the Thrashers than the Preds).  Going back to baseball, if the Yankees make a long term commitment to someone and it winds up being a bad deal, they can let the guy go and get someone else.  Teams like the Pirates, A’s, and Royals can’t do that, as they need to hang onto the guy.  If the Thrashers had a competent GM and some luck (Stefan not being a bust, the Heatley ordeal) who knows where they would be at.

From what I have read, the Preds situation is actually trying to go about it in a relatively right way.  The owner is trying to build a fan base and make a profit.  The only way they profit is through revenue sharing, but the hope is that eventually hockey takes hold in Nashville increasing revenue and one would think the payroll as well.

Posted by pens fan in baltimore on 07/13/10 at 12:57 PM ET

J.J. from Kansas's avatar

From what I have read, the Preds situation is actually trying to go about it in a relatively right way.  The owner is trying to build a fan base and make a profit.  The only way they profit is through revenue sharing, but the hope is that eventually hockey takes hold in Nashville increasing revenue and one would think the payroll as well.

Posted by pens fan in baltimore on 07/13/10 at 11:57 AM ET

The Predators are absolutely the best example for a team that’s trying to go about it in the right manner under the current CBA.  The problem is that they haven’t yet been able to turn a profit since the lockout, despite having fantastic management and one of the best coaches in hockey.

What hurts the Preds is the revenue sharing system in hockey doesn’t do enough for the small market teams who are really trying.  The revenue-sharing dollars and the way the cap system is set up around that makes it so that they can’t afford to pay for higher-end talent and get over that proverbial hump to be a really dangerous team.  If they spend enough to get the talent they need to really succeed, then they don’t get the revenue sharing dollars they so desperately need to make a profit.  The best a small-market team with good management and coaching can hope for is maybe catching enough breaks to get a conference finals appearance.  The Predators are likely not going to be a serious contender for the Stanley Cup anytime soon, despite having a fantastic bunch of minds in their front office.

The NHL is a league of haves and have-nots, there are just slightly more haves now than there used to be and the have-nots are in a lot more trouble than they ever were before the lockout.

You know what?  I’m sorry,  I completely derailed this post about Steinbrenner.  If anybody wants to discuss this further, my email is .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

My condolences to the Steinbrenner family.

Posted by J.J. from Kansas on 07/13/10 at 01:13 PM ET

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Paul Kukla founded Kukla’s Korner in 2005 and the site has since become the must-read site on the ‘net for all the latest happenings around the NHL.

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